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Live Cell Super Resolution Imaging: The Big Picture of Small Things

Live cell super resolution imaging: The big picture of small things

In this webinar, Stefan, Lauren, and Chunsong will discuss how to more easily create super resolution images. Olympus super resolution uses the IXplore SpinSR spinning disc confocal system to combine speed, sensitivity, and resolution for live-cell-compatible super resolution imaging. They will explain the steps involved to create super resolution images, including optical reassignment, Fourier analysis, and 3D deconvolution.

Presenters:

Stefan Marawske, Senior Sales Specialist, High-End Life Science Systems
Lauren Alvarenga, Product Manager, Life Science Microscopy
Chunsong Yan, Business Development Manager, Life Science

FAQ

Webinar FAQs | Live Cell Super-Resolution Imaging

What are the advantages of the IXplore SpinSR system over widefield-based structure elimination microscopes?

Speed is one of the major advantages of working with the IXplore SpinSR microscope. On widefield-based microscopes the grid has to move many times, and the camera’s exposure time limits speed. On the IXplore SpinSR system, you can collect a higher number of frames since it has a better detector. Another advantage is that the IXplore SpinSR microscope has better depth capability—you can use a thicker specimen and still get a better image.

Is 3D deconvolution necessary to achieve 120 nm resolution?

The dedicated hardware optics and the Olympus Super Resolution (OSR) algorithm are the system’s key components that achieve a 120 nm resolution. However, deconvolution will further enhance the image quality and contrast.

What software runs the Olympus IXplore SpinSR microscope?

The system is run by Olympus cellSens software, which is widely used for Olympus microscopes and can instantly recognize the correct hardware. Moreover, the user interface is straightforward and intuitive. 

What kinds of detection systems are available with the Olympus IXplore SpinSR microscope, and what’s the frame rate?

When imaging, the smaller the pixel, the better the resolution. With smaller pixels, you need to have better sensitivity and you also need to be careful of noise, so a Peltier-cooled scientific CMOS camera is the preferred option.  We use a 2k × 2k scientific camera with a quantum efficiency of more than 80%. However, the main limitation is the sample. If you have a brighter sample, your camera’s exposure time decides the frame rate, and you won’t have to acquire multiple images to construct one super resolution image. So, if for every exposure you get one super-resolved image, you reach up to 100 frames per second. In addition, the system gives you the option to have two cameras, enabling you to image two colors simultaneously. However, the system also comes with a built-in fast emission filter that enables you to do fast sequential multicolor imaging depending on the number of lasers and emission filters.

What types of lasers does the IXplore SpinSR system come with?

We provide all the usual lasers that conventional confocal microscopes have. We have solid state lasers that are very robust and stable and last longer than conventional gas lasers, with 405, 488, 560, and 640 as standard.

Can you use the Olympus IXplore SpinSR system for high-content screening?

Yes, absolutely. Olympus offers the advanced scanR high-content screening software. It comes with many unique features, such as the latest self-learning AI module (deep learning). It has a powerful interactive interface, can perform multilevel scanning, and is extremely versatile. Specifically concerning high-content screening, it offers exceptional speed and accuracy due to the parallel acquisition feature built into the scanR software.

Is it possible to carryout photo stimulation experiments on the IXplore SpinSR system in combination with confocal imaging?

Yes. Also, the system’s real-time controller can control older hardware through the TTL, which is much more accurate for time-dependent experiments

Do your objective lenses have correction collars for spherical aberrations? Are they easy to adjust?

We offer A Line application-driven objectives with correction collars and a silicone immersion objective that has a long working distance. It has a correction collar, and the silicone oil more closely matches the reflective index of the cytoplasm media, so you can image deeper with less aberrations. We also have some special high numerical aperture objectives, plan apochromat lenses that have an NA of 1.5 and come with a correction collar that you can set at different temperatures. So, ideally you can go up to 200 microns if you’re using a 30x silicone immersion objective.


Related Products

Super Resolution Microscope System

IXplore SpinSR

  • Super resolution down to 120 nm XY resolution
  • Prolonged cell viability in confocal time-lapse imaging due to less phototoxicity and bleaching
  • Switch between widefield, confocal, and super resolution with one click
  • Accurate 3D reconstruction with the world’s first plan apochromat objectives with a numerical aperture (NA) of 1.5*
    * As of November 2018. According to Olympus research.

Live Cell Super Resolution Imaging: The Big Picture of Small Things

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Ask the Experts:Live Cell Super Resolution Imaging: The Big Picture of Small Things

In this webinar, Stefan, Lauren, and Chunsong will discuss how to more easily create super resolution images. Olympus super resolution uses the IXplore SpinSR spinning disc confocal system to combine speed, sensitivity, and resolution for live-cell-compatible super resolution imaging. They will explain the steps involved to create super resolution images, including optical reassignment, Fourier analysis, and 3D deconvolution.

FAQ

Webinar FAQs | Live Cell Super-Resolution Imaging

What are the advantages of the IXplore SpinSR system over widefield-based structure elimination microscopes?

Speed is one of the major advantages of working with the IXplore SpinSR microscope. On widefield-based microscopes the grid has to move many times, and the camera’s exposure time limits speed. On the IXplore SpinSR system, you can collect a higher number of frames since it has a better detector. Another advantage is that the IXplore SpinSR microscope has better depth capability—you can use a thicker specimen and still get a better image.

Is 3D deconvolution necessary to achieve 120 nm resolution?

The dedicated hardware optics and the Olympus Super Resolution (OSR) algorithm are the system’s key components that achieve a 120 nm resolution. However, deconvolution will further enhance the image quality and contrast.

What software runs the Olympus IXplore SpinSR microscope?

The system is run by Olympus cellSens software, which is widely used for Olympus microscopes and can instantly recognize the correct hardware. Moreover, the user interface is straightforward and intuitive. 

What kinds of detection systems are available with the Olympus IXplore SpinSR microscope, and what’s the frame rate?

When imaging, the smaller the pixel, the better the resolution. With smaller pixels, you need to have better sensitivity and you also need to be careful of noise, so a Peltier-cooled scientific CMOS camera is the preferred option.  We use a 2k × 2k scientific camera with a quantum efficiency of more than 80%. However, the main limitation is the sample. If you have a brighter sample, your camera’s exposure time decides the frame rate, and you won’t have to acquire multiple images to construct one super resolution image. So, if for every exposure you get one super-resolved image, you reach up to 100 frames per second. In addition, the system gives you the option to have two cameras, enabling you to image two colors simultaneously. However, the system also comes with a built-in fast emission filter that enables you to do fast sequential multicolor imaging depending on the number of lasers and emission filters.

What types of lasers does the IXplore SpinSR system come with?

We provide all the usual lasers that conventional confocal microscopes have. We have solid state lasers that are very robust and stable and last longer than conventional gas lasers, with 405, 488, 560, and 640 as standard.

Can you use the Olympus IXplore SpinSR system for high-content screening?

Yes, absolutely. Olympus offers the advanced scanR high-content screening software. It comes with many unique features, such as the latest self-learning AI module (deep learning). It has a powerful interactive interface, can perform multilevel scanning, and is extremely versatile. Specifically concerning high-content screening, it offers exceptional speed and accuracy due to the parallel acquisition feature built into the scanR software.

Is it possible to carryout photo stimulation experiments on the IXplore SpinSR system in combination with confocal imaging?

Yes. Also, the system’s real-time controller can control older hardware through the TTL, which is much more accurate for time-dependent experiments

Do your objective lenses have correction collars for spherical aberrations? Are they easy to adjust?

We offer A Line application-driven objectives with correction collars and a silicone immersion objective that has a long working distance. It has a correction collar, and the silicone oil more closely matches the reflective index of the cytoplasm media, so you can image deeper with less aberrations. We also have some special high numerical aperture objectives, plan apochromat lenses that have an NA of 1.5 and come with a correction collar that you can set at different temperatures. So, ideally you can go up to 200 microns if you’re using a 30x silicone immersion objective.


Related Products

Super Resolution Microscope System

IXplore SpinSR

  • Super resolution down to 120 nm XY resolution
  • Prolonged cell viability in confocal time-lapse imaging due to less phototoxicity and bleaching
  • Switch between widefield, confocal, and super resolution with one click
  • Accurate 3D reconstruction with the world’s first plan apochromat objectives with a numerical aperture (NA) of 1.5*
    * As of November 2018. According to Olympus research.
Experts
Chunsong Yan
Business Development Manager, Life Science

Hello, my name is Chunsong Yan and I am a business development manager for life science at Olympus Australia and New Zealand. I am currently responsible for confocal, multiphoton, light sheet and slide scanning systems. I joined Olympus in 2003, working in various roles, always trying to offer the best Olympus solution to our customers.

Lauren Alvarenga
Product Manager, Life Science Microscopy

Hello. I’m Lauren Alvarenga and I work as a product manager for research imaging at Olympus where I’m currently responsible for imaging software and inverted and super-resolution microscopes. I have a B.Sc. in biomedical photographic communications from the Rochester Institute of Technology. I’ve been with Olympus since 2015, supporting the FLUOVIEW product lines in the US, Canada and Latin America.

Stefan Marawske
Senior Sales Specialist, High-End Life Science Systems

Hello, I’m Stefan Marawske and I’m your expert on super resolution microscopy. During my PhD in the field of physical chemistry I created a home-built microscope for localization-based super resolution and particle tracking. I was fascinated by the fact that these methods are able to break the famous Abbe limit and were able to resolve structures that could not be identified before.

I’ve been working for Olympus for more than 7 years and I’ve mainly been responsible for high-end imaging systems such as TIRF and spinning disc. These systems typically have a high level of flexibility as many different devices can be combined for various applications, so if you need any help in defining your dedicated configuration, please get in touch.

Live Cell Super Resolution Imaging: The Big Picture of Small ThingsSep 17 2021
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